About

Harry RutherfordHello. Welcome to Heraclitean Fire, the blog of Harry Rutherford. That’s me on the right. The title, Heraclitean Fire, is from the title of a poem by Gerard Manley Hopkins, That Nature is a Heraclitean Fire and of the comfort of the Resurrection. I chose it because it sounded good and as a tribute to Hopkins.

I also have a photoblog called Clouded Drab. I’m not a photographer, and my work there is very much a public learning process, but do please check it out.

There’s further online evidence of my existence on Flickr, deliciouslast.fm, Goodreads and Twitter. Or get the whole lot bundled together at FriendFeed.

RSS

RSS feed icon There’s one RSS feed for new posts and another one for comments.

Licensing

Anything posted on this blog which is original work by me is available under a Creative Commons attribution non-commercial licence.

Technical Credits

Kudos to all the people who write the software.

The blog is powered by WordPress.

I’m using Sandbox, the cunning WordPress theme with lots of semantic CSS mark-up so that if, for some peculiar reason, you wanted the third comment on any post in the category ‘catfish’ which was posted in November to be coloured pink, the CSS classes would be in place for you to do it.

WordPress plugins:

AJAX Comment Preview
Akismet
Dean’s Permalinks Migration
Different Posts Per Page
Dofollow
Extended Options
Feedburner Feed Statistics Collector
Flickr Draft Post
Page Links To
Postalicious
Simple Pie Core
Simple Tags
Tiny MCE Advanced
WordPress.com Stats
WordPress Database Backup
WP Page Numbers
WP Simple Sitemap
WP Super Cache

Thanks to everyone!

In fact, since I’m thanking software people, I might as well namecheck the other open-source & free software I use a lot in designing or running this site.

I use Cyberduck as an FTP client and Textwrangler for editing code.

GIMP is the program I use most for doing artwork and photoediting, although recently I’ve also been using ImageWell quite a lot.

Pukka, the del.icio.us posting client I use, isn’t actually free, but it’s so cheap and helpful that I think it deserves a shout-out anyway.

I use Firefox for testing, and the various occcasions when Safari’s erratic Java implementation gives up. Specifically, I use the version optimized for Intel Macs by Neil Bruce Lee at BeatnikPad.

And finally, I could barely function without Quicksilver, which has completely transformed the way I use my computer.